Hot Desking

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The Hot Desking module is where the accounts are created for devices without the need of having an extension number. A Hot Desking device is associated with an extension that previously had to be created in the module extensions with technology option “None”, i.e. without being associated with any device. A Hot Desking device can be associated with an extension by dialing the hot desking feature code (*80), the extension number, and the extension password. To remove the association, you only need to dial the hot desking feature code (*80).

General

VitalPBX Extensions Hot Desking

  • Technology, type of technology for this device. There are four options:
    • PJSIP, PJSIP device
    • SIP, sip device
    • IAX2, iax device
    • FXS, analog/digital device. This is displayed if you got the DAHDI module installed.
  • Emergency CID, this is the Emergency CID to use when placing an Emergency Call from this device.
  • Dispatchable Location, Location to use whenever an Emergency Call is places.
PJSIP
  • User Device*, username to be used when registering this device.
  • Password, password (secret) associated with this device. Passwords can be the weakest link on any externally accessible PBX system, as malicious users will attempt to locate extensions having weak passwords. Extensions that authenticate by using simple passwords such as “1234” stand a good chance of being compromised, allowing an attacker to place calls through your PBX. Pick strong passwords carefully and ensure that passwords are not given to anyone who does not need to know them. Passwords should be at least 8 characters long and should include a random mixture of letters (both upper- and lower-case), numbers, and special characters.
  • Profile, group of settings for this device. Each technology (PJSIP, SIP, IAX2, DAHDi, or None) must have at least one (default) profile that defines attributes for the technology. You can configure these profiles in the Settings->Technology Settings->Profiles menu.
  • Max Contacts, maximum number of contacts that can bind to an AoR.
  • Codecs, list of allowed codecs. The order in which the codecs are listed determines their order of preference. If you select at least one codec, the DISALLOW=ALL parameter will be added. This will ensure that the device will only use only the codecs that you specifically define for the device.
  • DTMF Mode, sets default dtmf-mode for sending Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF). The DTMF mode for a SIP device specifies how touchtone will be transmitted to the other side of the call. The default value is rfc4733. Available options are:
    • Rfc4733
    • info: SIP INFO messages (application/dtmf-relay)
    • shortinfo: SIP INFO messages (application/dtmf)
    • inband: Inband audio (requires 64 kbit codec -alaw, ulaw)
    • auto: Use rfc4733 if offered, in-band otherwise
  • Device Description, a short (optional) description to identify this device.
  • Deny, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. This option should be in the format of an IP address and subnet, such as 192.168.25.10/255.255.255.255 (denies traffic from this specific IP address), or 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 (to disallow traffic for this extension from the IP range of 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254). It is possible to enter a value of 0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 to deny all of the networks by default, and, to enter specific networks from which traffic can be accepted in the permit option. This option is commonly used to restrict endpoint usage to a particular network, so that if the endpoint is stolen or otherwise removed from the network, it cannot be used to place calls and will be essentially useless. This field is not required. If it is left blank, VitalPBX will not block traffic for this peer from any IP address.
  • Permit, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. For example, 192.168.10.0/255.255.255.0 allows traffic from any address on the 192.168.10.x network. The permit option is the opposite of the deny option. Specific IP addresses or networks can be added in this option to allow traffic for this extension from the entered IP/network. This field is not required. If it is left blank, traffic will be allowed from all IP addresses. Strengthen your system security by use of the deny and allow options, where possible. If the endpoint is static, we strongly recommend that you make proper use of the permit and deny options to ensure that traffic is only allowed from the specific address. Even if the endpoint is not static, but always resides on a known subnet, you should limit the allowed range to that specific subnet.
  • Ring Device, this determines whether incoming calls should cause the device to ring.
SIP
  • User*, user to register this device.
  • Password, password (secret) associated with this device.
  • Profile, technology profile to be associated with this device.
  • Codecs, list of allowed codecs. The order in which the codecs are listed determines their order of preference. If you do not select at least one codec, DISALLOW=ALL will be used.
  • DTMF Mode, sets default dtmf-mode for sending Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF). The DTMF mode for a SIP device specifies how touchtones will be transmitted to the other side of the call. The default value is rfc2833. Available options are:
    • info: SIP INFO messages (application/dtmf-relay)
    • shortinfo: SIP INFO messages (application/dtmf)
    • inband: Inband audio (requires 64 kbit codec -alaw, ulaw)
    • auto: Use rfc2833 if offered, in-band otherwise
  • Device Description*, a short description to identify this device.
  • Deny, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. This option should be in the format of an IP address and subnet, such as 192.168.25.10/255.255.255.255 (denies traffic from this specific IP address), or 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 (to disallow traffic for this extension from the IP range of 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254). It is possible to enter a value of 0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 to deny all of the networks by default, and, to enter specific networks from which traffic can be accepted in the permit option. This option is commonly used to restrict endpoint usage to a particular network, so that if the endpoint is stolen or otherwise removed from the network, it cannot be used to place calls and will be essentially useless. This field is not required. If it is left blank, VitalPBX will not block traffic for this peer from any IP address.
  • Permit, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. For example, 192.168.10.0/255.255.255.0 allows traffic from any address on the 192.168.10.x network. The permit option is the opposite of the deny option. Specific IP addresses or networks can be added in this option to allow traffic for this extension from the entered IP/network. This field is not required. If it is left blank, traffic will be allowed from all IP addresses. Strengthen your system security by use of the deny and allow options, where possible. If the endpoint is static, we strongly recommend that you make proper use of the permit and deny options to ensure that traffic is only allowed from the specific address. Even if the endpoint is not static, but always resides on a known subnet, you should limit the allowed range to that specific subnet.
  • NAT, (Network Address Translation) is a technology commonly used by firewalls and routers to allow multiple devices on a LAN with ‘private’ IP addresses to share a single public IP address. A private IP address is an address, which can only be addressed from within the LAN, but not from the Internet outside the LAN Options:
    • No: No special NAT handling other than RFC3581
    • Force: Pretend there was an rport parameter even if there wasn’t
    • Comedia: Send media to the port Asterisk received it from regardless of where the SDP says to send it.
    • Auto Force: Set the force_rport option if Asterisk detects NAT
    • Auto Comedia: Set the comedia option if Asterisk detects NAT
  • Ring Device, this determines whether incoming calls should cause this device to ring.
IAX2
  • User*, user to register this device.
  • Password, password (secret) associated with this device.
  • Profile, technology profile to be associated with this device.
  • Codecs, list of allowed codecs. The order in which the codecs are listed determines their order of preference. If you do not select at least one codec, DISALLOW=ALL will be used.
  • Device Description*, a short description to identify this device.
  • Deny, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. This option should be in the format of an IP address and subnet, such as 192.168.25.10/255.255.255.255 (denies traffic from this specific IP address), or 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 (to disallow traffic for this extension from the IP range of 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254). It is possible to enter a value of 0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 to deny all of the networks by default, and, to enter specific networks from which traffic can be accepted in the permit option. This option is commonly used to restrict endpoint usage to a particular network, so that if the endpoint is stolen or otherwise removed from the network, it cannot be used to place calls and will be essentially useless. This field is not required. If it is left blank, VitalPBX will not block traffic for this peer from any IP address.
  • Permit, in a user/peer definition, allows you to limit SIP traffic to and from this peer to a certain IP or network. For example, 192.168.10.0/255.255.255.0 allows traffic from any address on the 192.168.10.x network. The permit option is the opposite of the deny option. Specific IP addresses or networks can be added in this option to allow traffic for this extension from the entered IP/network. This field is not required. If it is left blank, traffic will be allowed from all IP addresses. Strengthen your system security by use of the deny and allow options, where possible. If the endpoint is static, we strongly recommend that you make proper use of the permit and deny options to ensure that traffic is only allowed from the specific address. Even if the endpoint is not static, but always resides on a known subnet, you should limit the allowed range to that specific subnet.
  • Ring Device, this determines whether incoming calls should cause this device to ring.
FXS – (Only appears when the DAHDI add-on is installed.)
  • Channel*, the Telephony (DAHDi) channels, selected from the drop-down list, to be associated with this device.
  • Profile, technology profile to be associated with this device.
  • Device Description*, a short description to identify this device.
  • Ring Device, this determines whether incoming calls should cause this device to ring.
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